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Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017
Commentary

Gil Thelen: My Parkinson’s crash course

I wasn’t ready for a crash course in neurology that day two years ago. I was enjoying semi-retirement, assuming my medical writing days were far behind me. But then the doctor said, “You have Parkinson’s disease.”

Ever since, I have been immersed in Parkinson’s 101: What it means to live with a chronic neurological disease.

This month is Parkinson’s Awareness Month. Accordingly, I think even more about the 5,000 people in the United States who will also hear those words this month.

What do I wish I had known when I was diagnosed?

It’s a snowflake disease. Just like a snowflake, each of us is unique, and so is our Parkinson’s. Do not assume your disease will look like someone else’s.

Some symptoms are invisible. Because many of us associate Parkinson’s with movement symptoms, we may ignore signs of depression, fatigue, constipation or sleep problems (especially acting out nightmares). In recent years, the medical field has recognized that such symptoms are part of the disease. If you experience them, tell your doctor so they can be diagnosed and treated for what they really represent.

A Parkinson’s specialist can help. Most of us see a general neurologist for our care, without realizing we might benefit from seeing a movement disorder specialist. Those neurologists, who have undergone two years of additional training, can help us better manage the disease and stay current on research and clinical trials.

Staying active is essential. Parkinson’s may affect our movement, but staying active can help in the long run. Research shows that intensive, sustained exercise — such as boxing, hot yoga and interval cycling — can ease symptoms and combat fatigue. And that regular daily activity — going for walks, doing the laundry — can help improve life with Parkinson’s.

We can benefit from complementary care. In addition to medications, we can benefit from physical, speech and occupational therapy and the knowledge of nutritionists and psychotherapists. Putting together a care team of these professionals early on can pay off for years to come. But due to the fragmentation of PD care delivery, it takes effort on your part to assemble that team.

All support groups are not created equal. Support groups have different constituencies (young/elderly onset-newly diagnosed), different energy levels, different ambitions and agendas. Shop widely before you choose.

There is a lack of localized information.

Patients want close-to-home answers. Where do I locate the physical therapy that doctors often suggest? How do I find a personal trainer who specializes in PD? Who can help me make my home safe from falls? Where do I enroll in recommended tai chi, spinning or boxing classes? In most locales, there is no one place to find answers to those and dozens more local questions. National PD foundations offer effective national advice but can only do so much at the granular, local level.

We can live well. Most importantly, I learned it is not only possible to corral the disease but essential to do so. Never, never give in to the disease or lose hope. Cognitive decline and dementia are worrisome, but not inevitable, accomplices to PD neuromuscular difficulties. Find your passions. Mine are advocating for research, raising awareness and sharing validated information.

Also, remember that you are not are not alone. There are 1 million of us nationwide. Groups such as the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation and the National Parkinson Foundation are available to support us. Contact them to find information and resources. Together, we can not only live well with Parkinson’s, one day we can end it.

Moving Day

The Moving Day Tampa Bay walk benefiting the National Parkinson Foundation is Saturday at the University of South Florida Marshall Center starting at 9 a.m. The event is for all ages and abilities. There will be a variety of movement activities, such as boxing, yoga, dance, Pilates, tai chi, stretching and much more before the walk. The purpose is to celebrate the importance of movement in our lives. For more information go to www.MovingDayTampaBay.org or call (800) 473-4636.

Help raise awareness this month by taking advantage of the free tools available through the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF) #EndParkinsons toolkit — including a free social media badge, free posters available in English and Spanish, free tree ribbons, as well as awareness tools for purchase, including the official Parkinson’s Awareness T-Shirt — by visiting www.pdf.org/parkinson_awareness.

Gil Thelen is executive director of the Florida Society of News Editors and a patient advocate in the Tampa Bay area for the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation. He retired as The Tampa Tribune’s president and publisher in 2006. This column is adapted from a post by the writer on Allsup’s All Things Disability blog http://blog.allsup.com/.

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