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AP Top News at 8:49 p.m. EDT

ROCKFORD, Wash. (AP) Caleb Sharpe rode the bus to his high school in a tiny Washington state town, carrying a black duffel bag. The 15-year-old walked to a second-floor hallway, pulled an assault weapon from the bag and tried to load it, authorities said. It jammed, and a classmate walked up. "I always knew you were going to shoot up the school," the student said, according to court documents released Thursday. "You know this is going to get you in trouble." Sharpe pulled a pistol from his coat pocket and shot his classmate, also 15, in the abdomen and then in the face, killing him, according to the documents.NEW YORK (AP) Credit agency Equifax traced the theft of sensitive information about 143 million Americans to a software flaw that could have been fixed well before the burglary occurred, further undermining its credibility as the guardian of personal data that can easily be used for identity theft. Equifax identified a weakness in an open-source software package called Apache Struts as the technological crack that allowed hackers to heist Social Security numbers, birthdates, addresses and full legal names from a massive database maintained primarily for lenders. SECURITY FOR DUMMIES The disclosure , made late Wednesday, cast the company's damaging security lapse in an even harsher light.FORT BRAGG, N.C. (AP) A training exercise involving demolitions killed one special operations soldier and injured seven others at the Army's largest base Thursday, just a day after 15 Marines were hurt in a fire while training in California. The soldiers were taken to several hospitals, including the Womack Army Medical Center on base for treatment, said Lt. Col. Rob Bockholt, a spokesman for the U.S. Army's Special Operations Command, which is based at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. Staff Sgt. Alexander P. Dalida, 32, of Dunstable, Massachusetts, was killed during the exercise, Bockholt said. The cause of death is under investigation.CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) For more than a decade, NASA's Cassini spacecraft at Saturn took "a magnifying glass" to the enchanting planet, its moons and rings. Cassini revealed wet, exotic worlds that might harbor life: the moons Enceladus and Titan. It unveiled moonlets embedded in the rings. It also gave us front-row seats to Saturn's changing seasons and a storm so vast that it encircled the planet. "We've had an incredible 13-year journey around Saturn, returning data like a giant firehose, just flooding us with data," project scientist Linda Spilker said this week from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.NEW YORK (AP) Lady Gaga has been hospitalized and forced to pull out of the upcoming Rock in Rio music festival in Brazil, citing "severe physical pain" and posting a photo of what resembles an IV in her arm. The 31-year-old singer-songwriter wrote on Twitter that she had to take care of her body and asked fans for their "grace and understanding." Her representatives said in a statement Thursday that Lady Gaga was suffering from "severe physical pain" that affected her ability to perform and that she was under the care of "expert medical professionals." It wasn't clear what she was suffering from or where she was being treated.WASHINGTON (AP) The Trump administration on Thursday extended sanctions relief to Iran, avoiding imminent action that could implode the landmark 2015 nuclear deal, even as President Donald Trump and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson accused Tehran of not respecting the entire agreement. The extensions of the waivers on nuclear sanctions, first issued by the Obama administration, were accompanied by new penalties imposed against 11 Iranian people and companies accused of supporting Iran's ballistic missile program or involvement in cyber-attacks against the U.S. financial system. The combination of steps known internally as "waive and slap" came as the administration nears completion of a monthslong review of its Iran policy that is expected next month, perhaps as early as October 15 when Trump must inform Congress if Iran is complying with the terms of the nuclear agreement and whether the deal remains in U.S.IMMOKALEE, Fla. (AP) Larry and Elida Dimas didn't have much to begin with, and Hurricane Irma left them with even less. The storm peeled open the roof of the old mobile home where they live with their 18-year-old twins, and it destroyed another one they rented to migrant workers in Immokalee, one of Florida's poorest communities. Someone from the government already has promised aid, but Dimas' chin quivers at the thought of accepting it. "I don't want the help," said Larry Dimas, 55. "But I need it." Dimas is one of millions of Floridians who live in poverty, and an untold number of them have seen their lives up-ended by Irma.SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) The shrieks of children playing volleyball and the occasional barking of dogs echoed inside Puerto Rico's largest convention center, transformed into a shelter for hurricane victims from other Caribbean islands as hundreds of families devastated by the Category 5 storm transition toward new lives. For many, that included tearful good-byes as they leave behind children with friends or family on the U.S. mainland, where they can go to school while their parents return to jobs on the islands and try to rebuild their lives. Puerto Rico has received more than 2,000 U.S. citizens who were living or vacationing in islands battered by Hurricane Irma last week, including more than 500 who arrived via cruise ship on Thursday.

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